Monthly Archives: September 2011

Jurassic Park in cinemas & on Blu-Ray

Jurassic Park to be Re-Released in Cinemas
from September 23rd, 2011 to Celebrate the Launch
of this Ground-Breaking Trilogy on Blu-ray™

All Three Epic Adventures from Filmmaker Steven Spielberg Plus More Than Two Hours of All-New Bonus Features
Available on Blu-ray™ For the First Time Ever On October 24, 2011

DUBLIN, September 6th, 2011 – Universal Pictures Ireland is pleased to announce that Jurassic Park, the first film from Steven Spielberg’s famous trilogy will be re-released on Friday, September 23rd, 2011 in Irish cinemas to celebrate the launch of all three films on Blu-ray™.

One of the most anticipated motion-picture trilogies of all time Jurassic Park, The Lost World: Jurassic Park and Jurassic Park III will debut as a trilogy set on Blu-ray™ October 24th 2011 from Universal Pictures International Home Entertainment. Acclaimed filmmaker Steven Spielberg’s award-winning cinematic franchise, based on the best-selling book by Michael Crichton, generated nearly $2 billion combined at the worldwide box office and featured groundbreaking visual effects that changed the art of movie-making forever. Now, all three epic films have been digitally restored and remastered in flawless high definition for the ultimate viewing experience. In addition, the films’ visceral sound effects and the unforgettable music from legendary composer John Williams can now be heard in pristine 7.1 surround sound. This collectible three-movie set also features hours of bonus features, including an all-new, six-part documentary and digital copies of all three films that can be viewed on an array of portable devices anytime, anywhere. The Jurassic Park Ultimate Trilogy is also available in a spectacular Limited Edition Gift Set, Ultimate Collector’s Gift Set and on DVD.

The Jurassic Park Ultimate Trilogy features an all-star cast including Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, Samuel L. Jackson, Richard Attenborough, Ariana Richards, Joseph Mozzello, Julianne Moore, Vince Vaughn, William H. Macy and Tea Leoni. In addition to the talented cast of actors, the Trilogy features stars of a different magnitude—from the huge Tyrannosaurus rex to the vicious Velociraptor, the Jurassic Park films showcase an extraordinary level of realism and technical innovation brought to life by a talented design team which include: Stan Winston, Live Action Dinosaurs; ILM’s Dennis Muren, Full Motion Dinosaurs; Phil Tippett, Dinosaur Supervisor; Michael Lantieri, Special Dinosaur Effects and Special Visual Effects by Industrial Light & Magic. Continue reading

Stars Behind the Camera Season at the IFI

The IFI presents the first part of the Stars Behind the Camera Season

October 1st– 30th (IFI Box Office 01 679 3477 www.ifi.ie)

To coincide with three new releases directed by actors Woody Allen (Midnight In Paris), Paddy Considine (Tyrannosaur) and George Clooney (The Ides of March); the IFI is examining the rich history of stars behind the camera that stretches back to D.W. Griffith, Cecil B. DeMille and Charlie Chaplin.

The motivations for taking the creative reigns of film production may vary but the result has often made for riveting cinema. An established actor often enters the craft of film direction with to develop personal projects and brings with them an unmatchable understanding of their performers. Others like Chaplin, Tati and Allen have based the greater part of their careers around starring and directing in films that bear their personal stamp.

Highlights of the season include Woody Allen’s hugely popular The Purple Rose of Cairo and George Clooney’s stylish liberal homage to journalistic courage during McCarthyism, Good Night, and Good Luck. Check out two classic silent comedies The General by Buster Keaton and City Lights by Charlie Chaplain, the two comic masters of the silent era, and Jacques Tati’s Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday, their equally accomplished visual comedian from the 1950s. Gary Oldman’s current triumph as George Smiley in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy provides the perfect excuse to revisit his one foray into direction, the gritty semi-autobiographical Nil by Mouth. And if you’ve never seen it, don’t pass up this opportunity to see Orson Welles’ iconic and astonishing continuous tracking shot that opens Touch of Evil.
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IRELAND’S FIRST EVER INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY FILM FESTIVAL ABÄRA COMMENCES THIS OCTOBER

Abära, Ireland’s first ever International Disability Film Festival kicks off this October with a selection of stunning films from around the world. Aimed at celebrating the progress made by people with disabilities while increasing awareness and understanding of the many challenges still faced by people with disabilities across the globe, Abära opens on Thursday, October 20th and continues until October 23rd.

This innovative Festival is organised by the Dóchas Disability and International Development (DID) working group, in conjunction with Arts & Disability Ireland and would not be possible without the invaluable financial contribution of the Department of Justice and Equality. Running in various venues across Dublin City – The IFI, Temple Bar and axis, Ballymun, with sister events taking place in Galway at the Eye Cinema. Abära is an unmissable diary date for all interested in quality cinema which addresses subjects rarely tackled in mainstream culture or media.

Abära chair, Aidan Leavy comments, “It’s a privilege to present Abära to you – Ireland’s first ever International Disability Film Festival, cinema by, with and about people with disabilities. These incredible, critically acclaimed films challenge stereotypes, enrich our understanding of the issues surrounding disability in the global north and south and offer different perspectives of lives lived in our world. They’re also entertaining and thought-provoking films which can only add to the already rich offering of cinema in this country.” Continue reading

DRIVE

DRIVE
Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn. Starring Ryan Gosling, Carey Mulligan, Bryan Cranston, Ron Perlman, Albert Brooks. 100 mins
Rating: Five/Five
In cinemas September 23
EDGY, VICIOUS AND THRILLING B-MOVIE ACTION THRILLER

In the phenomenal action thriller Drive, Ryan Gosling plays a stoic stunt driver known only as ‘The Kid.’ With his moral compass and personal relationships comfortably coasting in neutral, he moonlights as a getaway driver. His uncompromising philosophy is echoed by Drive’s director, Nicolas Winding Refn, who sets an incredible pace, knowing exactly when to sit quietly in the shadows before suddenly revving Drive into fifth gear, tyres screeching.

As newly acquainted neighbours, Gosling and Carey Mulligan give breath-taking performances, sharing a seductive chemistry that grows on vines of stolen glances and meaningful silences until it blankets them like ivy. Their scenes together are gentle, filled with a tenderness and longing that’s never overplayed, and all the more powerful for it.

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RED STATE

RED STATE
Directed by Kevin Smith. Starring Michael Parks, John Goodman, Melissa Leo. 97 mins.
Rating: Two and a Half/Five
In cinemas September 30
KEVIN SMITH’S POLITICAL HORROR HAS A BRILLIANTLY CHILLING PREMISE, BUT QUICKLY LOSES ITS WAY

Bringing his trademark black humour and edge to a politically tinged horror, Kevin Smith’s Red State sees three teenage boys become the victims of a Westbro Baptist Church-like cult. But with the police force experiencing an ethical crisis of its own, the church members aren’t the hostages’ only threat.

Michael Perks plays Pastor Abin Cooper, a patriarch who revels in his congregation’s rapt adoration, and whose lengthy sermons are brimming with as much charisma as crazed fundamentalism. Perks’ performance is so captivating, so chillingly sinister that it’s impossible to focus on anything else. Including the body hanging from a crucifix behind him.

By contrast, Keenan (a wonderful John Goodman), a tired ATF agent, has many superiors to answer to, which he does over a series of one-sided telephone calls. This innovative representation of the two disparate sides of power demonstrates the personal responsibility involved in choosing to follow doctrine or orders, and proves that any party that claims moral omniscience is a dangerous one.

It’s a brilliant opening act, intelligent and terrifying in equal measure, and as the teens’ frenzied attempts to escape the Cooper house are captured on speeding mounted cameras, Red State sets itself up as visceral and truly unsettling horror. Continue reading

MELANCHOLIA

MELANCHOLIA
Directed by Lars Von Trier. Starring Kristen Dunst, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Kiefer Sutherland,
Rating: Three and a half/Five
In cinemas Sepetmber 30
LARS VON TRIER’S PSYCHOLOGICAL DRAMA IS BEAUTIFUL, BUT SHOCKINGLY, LACKS BITE

Partly due to Lars Von Trier’s last feature, the beautiful and disturbing Antichrist, and partly due to his last appearance at Cannes, the ugly and disturbing ‘Nazi-gate’, his new psychological disaster drama Melancholia feels surprisingly controversy-free. A sumptuous examination of the psychological state of two sisters, the film sees the depressive Justine (Kirsten Dunst) self-destruct at her fairytale wedding, while Claire’s (Charlotte Gainsbourg) fears have a more tangible source: a large planet with the Von Trier-subtle moniker of ‘Melancholia’ is headed towards Earth.

Gainsbourg is predictably wonderful, though the impact of Claire’s plight is somewhat lessened by Gainsbourg’s own CV. Having played the anxiety-ridden wife at war with nature numerous times before – including under Von Trier’s direction – it’s a little bit “been here, seen that, watched you battle the demons of flora/fauna/impending apocalypse before.”

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PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES

PAGE ONE: INSIDE THE NEW YORK TIMES
Directed by Andrew Rossi. Starring David Carr, Carl Bernstein, Bruce Headlam, Bill Keller, Brian Stelter. 92 mins
Rating: Four/Five
In Cinemas September 23
DOCUMENTARY ABOUT NEW VS. OLD MEDIA ACTS AS A FASCINATING FRONT PAGE TO A VERY COMPLEX STORY

As Twitter is used to share links to online articles whose headlines proclaim that print journalism is dead, Page One: Inside the New York Times offers a frank, funny and passion-filled examination of the changing landscape of print journalism. Giving an insight into the inner workings of life in The New York Times, Page One examines how the staff’s methods and morale have been affected by new technology, and how this one-time monopoly power on information, authority and elitism is ironically floundering in this, “the information age.” Oh these times, they are a-changing.

Though Page One uses talking heads to delve into the economic reasons behind the paper’s lay-offs and changing approach to news, it places more focus on the real characters involved in the production, particularly the staffers at the Media Desk which, like Page One itself, focuses on media itself and the role in society. Page One also delves into broader issues facing journalists, examining the battle between Old and New Media using the Pentagon Papers and the Wikileaks Collateral Damage scandal to illustrate.

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SOUL SURFER

SOUL SURFER
Directed by Sean McNamara. Starring Annasophia Robb, Dennis Quaid, Helen Hunt, Carrie Underwood. 106 mins
Rating: One and a half/Five
In cinemas September 23
INSPIRING TRUE STORY UNDERMINED BY A SANITIZED AND SICKLY SWEET RELIGIOUS THEME

Jeebus wept. If this fortnight’s Red State takes religious fervour to terrifying extremes, Soul Surfer goes to the opposite end of the spectrum: pure sanitized tripe. This is the type of God-loving that depicts the Virgin Mary with blonde L’oreal locks, paints a crucified Jesus with abs Abercrombie and Fitch models would be proud of, and ruins a truly inspirational real life story by letting its sickly religious message slowly but constantly drip from it, like Chinese water torture.

The charming Anna Sophia Robb plays teen surfer Bethany Hamilton, who overcame losing her left arm in a shark attack and returned to professional surfing. Raised in the paradise setting of Hawaii, ideal child Bethany volunteers at her Carrie Underwood-led Bible group and has a harmonious relationship with groovy surfer parents Dennis Quaid and Helen Hunt, who, when not trying to wrangle some emotion out of the tears-by-numbers script, awkwardly attempt to ride the waves. (Hunt has an OSCAR for Crisps’ sake, let the woman keep her feet on dry land and her dignity intact.)

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YOU INSTEAD

YOU INSTEAD
Directed by Starring Luke Treadaway, Natalia Tena, Mathew Baynton, Alastair Mackenzie, Ruta Gedmintas. 80 minutes.
Rating: One and a half/Five
In cinemas September 16
MISGUIDED FESTIVAL FLIRTATION FLICK IS A BADLY ACTED AND INEFFECTIVE AD FOR T IN THE PARK

Hot on the heels of Electric Picnic, You Instead will undoubtedly speak to festival lovers. Well, the festival lovers whose weekend of great music was ruined by the unfortunate presence of narcissistic rockstar wannabes, drunken idiots, and that unfortunate hook-up that you can’t explain and you’d rather forget – much like your ensemble of denim hot-pants, Native American headdress and neon shutter glasses. It all seemed like such a good idea at the time.

As must have You Instead. A potentially fun and frothy frolic through pheromone-fuelled festival flirtation, Luke Treadway plays Adam, the successful and cocky frontman of American indie band The Make. Upon arriving at a music festival, he’s almost immediately handcuffed to punk girl Morello (Natalia Tena.) With important gigs looming for both of them and unimpressed significant others in tow, the two must overcome their differences and…

Let’s leave it there. You know what’s going to happen. What you can’t imagine is how badly it’s executed. Shot on location at T in the Park, You Instead does manage to capture the dizzying messiness of music festivals, mainly by being a complete mess itself. Jumping between stock concert footage to the goddawful scripted portions to an in-feature documentary and back again, there’s no aesthetic or narrative flow to the visuals, which waste the brilliantly atmospheric settings of fairground rides and intimate backstage concerts. Continue reading

A LONELY PLACE TO DIE

A LONELY PLACE TO DIE
Directed by Julian Gilbey. Starring Melissa George, Ed Speleers, Kate MacGowan. 99 mins.
Rating: Two and a Half/Five
In cinemas September 7
STRIKING AND VISCERAL SCOTLAND-BASED THRILLER LOSES FOCUS IN SECOND ACT

Starting like a blend of 127 Hours and Buried, A Lonely Place to Die sees mountain climber Alison (Melissa George) and three friends stumble across a young Serbian girl buried in an underground enclosure high in the Scottish mountains. As they attempt to bring her to safety, they must survive not only the relentless chase of the girl’s kidnappers but the merciless terrain.

Captured the Scottish highlands in all their beautiful, raw glory, director Julian Gilbey brilliantly uses the setting not only to create atmosphere, but a real sense of danger. As the climbers try to lose their attackers in the mountainous landscape, nature itself becomes yet another enemy. An opening scene where one of the climbers dangles precariously upside down form a cliff-face is a terrifying, dizzying, head-rush, shot masterfully with a spinning camera. It’s one of several effecting visual tricks in the film which create some truly breath-catching moments.

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