Larry’s Penile implant

Hustler publisher Larry Flynt recently revealed that he is still sexually active at 70 years old thanks to a penile implant. “There’s a little reservoir in the bottom part of your stomach, and you trigger it with a button inside your testicles that doesn’t show. Nothing shows,” Flynt explained. Penile implants have become increasingly popular in the last few years. Drugs like Viagra can be of no use to men who have suffered chronic diseases or nerve damage.

Sex ED for kids

Chicago is set to introduce a new sex education programme for all schools, including pre-schools. The policy from the Chicago Board of Education makes it mandatory that sex education be given in all grades. The youngest children will learn about anatomy, reproduction, healthy relationships and personal safety. For the first time in Chicago, sex education will also cover sexual orientation and gender identity. It is hoped this will increase awareness, promote tolerance and prevent bullying, said the school board.

Underpants please!

Residents in the Japanese town of Okuizumom are requesting changes to the town’s replica statues of the Venus de Milo and Michelangelo’s David – they
want them to be given knickers! Residents are worried the statues will frighten children. Town official Yoji Morinaga commented, “They are statues of unclothed humans, and such pieces of art work are very rare in our area. Some people apparently said the statues might not be good for their children.”

Should we reclaim the word cunt?

This week, the satirical news site The Onion found itself in hot water over a tweet in which it referred to the nine-year old actress Quvenzhané Wallis as “kind of a cunt, right?”

The whole point of the joke was, of course, that little Quvenzhané is all kinds of adorable and therefore anything but. Many people took exception to it, and it’s not that hard to see why.

By and large, cunt is regarded as the most offensive insult you can term a woman. It was not always so. In the 13th century it was a standard anatomical term, and interchangeable with vagina. However, over the next few centuries it fell out of favour, and by the Victorian 18th century, the word was regarded as strictly taboo.

When we call someone a cunt, twat, dick, prick or a pussy, the power of the insult lies in the reference to the human body’s fiddly bits. However, you could argue, and many people have, that words referring to the genitals should not be seen as inherently insulting and that by doing so, we betray a deep-seated problem with sex and sexuality.

To reclaim these words as positive would – in a small way – contribute to a society with a healthier attitude to sexuality. But reclaiming words is no easy task, especially when they have a long history.

During the 2011 Slutwalk protests the term slut came under the spotlight. Of the many debates the movement engendered one of the most heated was whether or not slut could be reclaimed as a positive badge of identity, much like how queer has been shorn of its pejorative connotations.

It is possible, but it is worth bearing in mind that queer had been used as a derogatory term for less than one hundred years before being reclaimed – its first recorded usage is an 1894 letter written by Oscar Wilde’s nemesis, the Marquess of Queensberry. Slut has a much longer history and has been used to designate a promiscuous woman for about 450 years. Slut is of doubtful origin, but the earliest reference to it comes from as far back as 1402 – referring to an untidy woman.

The Onion has since apologised for the tweet and it was obviously meant as a joke. From an Irish perspective it may not seem like bad taste, or a gag that fell flat and therefore not such a big deal, but using the term in reference to a young African-American girl has implications we wouldn’t necessarily understand. Writing in The Rumpus, Roxane Gay noted that young black girls are regularly seen as hypersexual. In such a context, The Onion joke fails as satire because it reinforces a negative stereotype instead of holding it up to ridicule.

Since it refers to a body part, much like elbow or nose, theoretically it should be possibly to reclaim the word cunt and give it a positive spin – or at least remove its stigma. After all, we don’t use the proper names of genitals as insults. Obviously we could – “You sir, are a penis!”

I’d like to live in a world where cunt wasn’t an insult but seen as a positive term for a part of the female body that is a source of life and pleasure. But even if it were a sex-positive term, it would still be wrong to use it in reference to a nine-year old child – particularly in a widely read media source. First off because it is wrong to use sexualised words with reference to children; and secondly, because using the media to bash a child, even a famous, successful one, is just plain nasty.


World Aid’s Day take place on 1 December and in the lead up to it Durex are donating one free condom for everyone who gets involved on Facebook or Twitter.

To donate a condom to help stop the spread of HIV/Aids, log on to Facebook and share the Durex World Aids Day image or video (available on or use he Twitter hash tag #1share1condom.

Your donated condom will be sent to the Dublin Aids Alliance, which does great work in sexual health education and combating HIV?transmission.

The campaign runs until 1 December.


Wow, I have been banging on for years about the importance of sex education and it seems I am talking to a brick wall. Results from Durex’s survey for National Condom Week reveal that just over half of Irish 18-year-olds will leave secondary school with any formal sexual health education at all. A third of all Irish people have received none.

So where are we learning about sex?

41 percent say their friends and peers enlightened them, 35 percent read up on the subject in books, 31 percent look to magazines and 27 per cent get it from television. No porn? I find that hard to believe.

Discussing their first experience of sex, 30 percent of us felt ready but only 11 percent felt well-informed. Hardly surprising. Although what is surprising is that we were more ready than our Australians (23 percent), Greeks (18 percent) and Japanese (5 percent) peers.

Even more surprising is that more than a third of us enjoyed our first sexual experience. Presumably there is a cross-over between those who feel ready and those who have a good time, although for many people their first experience of sex is a letdown. But things certainly improve with practice!

Rather worryingly, more than 80 per cent of Irish men and women risk STIs and unplanned pregnancy by not always using a condom with a new partner or someone who is not their main partner. Not clever, especially as the average number of sexual partners we have is steadily creeping up. In 2012, men averaged 17 sexual partners while women had 8.

Free lube!

Durex Ireland giving away 10,000 free samples of their Play lube. Nice!

To get yours log on to Durex Ireland’s Facebook page fill in a quick survey and they’ll send a sample to you. You will find it here.

You do have to be over 18 and living in Ireland though…

Irish do well in latest Durex Sex Survey

Ah, I love a good survey… Every year the Durex Sexual Wellbeing Global Survey tries to give a snapshot of sexual attitudes and behaviours around the world. The 2012 survey had some interesting stats on the Irish and it is mostly good news:

Two thirds of Irish couples have sex at least once a week – that’s more than the Japanese (27%), Aussies (62%) and the Swiss (62%).

We spend an average of 17 minutes on foreplay – that’s the global average, which means we’re not slacking but not exactly putting in extra effort either. Room for improvement I think…

We also spend 17 minutes on the actual penetrative part as well. That’s more than the supposedly sex gods, the French and their feeble 14 minutes, and better than the Brits (14 mins), the Spanish (15 mins) and the Germans (16 mins – and since they are Germans I presume 16 mins is very efficient).

Condom usage is up. Around 70% of us always practice safe sex. A few years back Durex found that around half of us didn’t always use condoms, even with a new partner.

So we’re getting smarter with our health and are not too shabby in the bedroom gymnastics department either. A big round of applause to us all!

Bliss Festival: Sexual Pleasure in Louth!

After a successful festival earlier this year, the folks behind Bliss are back with a new weekend dedicated to sexual pleasure. The workshops cover a wide variety of topics, from tantra to BDSM, which should mean there is something for everyone. The festival takes place over the 4th and 5th of August in Drogheda.This may seem like an odd choice but then again, Drogheda is the town that spawned me… You can read all the details at here.